Quantcast



Jessica Chastain Blasts CBS for Lack of Female Leads in Fall Lineup

Actress Jessica Chastain pummeled CBS via web-based networking media Thursday over the system’s absence of female leads in indicates slated for its fall lineup.

“I’ll just @netflix and chill. Or, on the other hand some @HBO significance. Or, on the other hand anything by #RyanMurphy,” Chastain tweeted Wednesday, connecting to an article about how CBS neglected to deliver a solitary fall appear with a female lead. “There’s such a large number of amazing choices that do exclude @CBS.”

The system has confronted furious feedback for a considerable length of time over its absence of racial decent variety in its programming, most as of late after Asian-American Hawaii Five-0 stars Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park supposedly left the long-running CBS appear over a salary dispute with the system, after the match were professedly offered less cash than their white co-stars.

CBS senior official VP of programming Thom Sherman tended to the debate Tuesday amid a press occasion at the Television Critics Association visit in Beverly Hills.

“We are cognizant of the issue, we hear you and we will be looking to expand the casting department,” he said.

(L-R) Executive producers Akiva Goldsman, Heather Kadin, Gretchen Berg, Aaron Harberts, and Alex Kurtzman, and actors James Frain, Sonequa Martin, Mary Chieffo, and Jason Isaacs of ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ speak onstage during the CBS portion of the 2017 Summer Television Critics Association Press Tour at CBS Studio Center on August 1, 2017 in Los Angeles. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Executive producer/showrunner Ted Humphrey and actors Jake Matthews, Monica Potter, Jeremy Piven, Richard T. Jones, Natalia Tena, and Blake Lee of ‘Wisdom of the Crowd’ speak onstage during the CBS portion of the 2017 Summer Television Critics Association Press Tour at CBS Studio Center on August 1, 2017 in Los Angeles. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

But Sherman’s remarks sound similar to those made a year ago by former CBS’ chief executive Glenn Geller, who had acknowledged then that the network needed to “do better” in terms of diversity.

“I’m really glad this question came up first because we’re very mindful at CBS of the importance of diversity and inclusion,” Geller told reporters at the Television Critics Association press tour last August. The network was facing fire for all-white fall TV shows at the time.

“We need to do better and we know it. That’s really it, we need to do better. In terms of leads we are definitely less diverse this year than last year, and like I said we need to do better,” Geller said.

Chastain also slammed the “disturbing” way in which women were portrayed in films at the Cannes Film Festival.

“I really took away from this experience is how the world views women from the female characters that I saw represented,” Chastain said in May. “It was quite disturbing to me, to be honest — there are some exceptions.”